World Population Clock

Introducing the World and U.S. Population Clock

The U.S. Census Bureau has released an updated version of its population clock, one of the most widely visited features on the census.gov website. The enhanced clock provides a quick and interactive overview of the population in the world and in the United States.

“As part of the celebration of 2013 as the International Year of Statistics, the Census Bureau is celebrating the role of statistics in everyday life through new, interactive and easily accessible data tools such as the population clock,” said Victoria Velkoff, the assistant division chief in charge of estimates and projections in the Census Bureau’s Population Division. “The introduction of the updated ‘pop clock’ will further broaden the public’s appreciation for and grasp of population statistics.”

About the World Population Clock

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base

The Country Ranking tool provides a quick and easy method to view the most populous countries and areas of the world for any year between 1950 and 2050. The data for this tool are drawn from the International Data Base (IDB), which offers additional demographic information for each country.

“Top 10 Most Populous Countries”, projected as of July 1, 2013.

To learn more about world population projections go to http://www.census.gov/population/popwnotes.html

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is the equivalent of Eastern Standard Time (EST) plus 5 hours or Eastern Daylight Saving Time (EDT) plus 4 hours.

About the U.S. Population Clock

The U.S. population clock is based on a series of short-term projections for the resident population of the United States. This includes people whose usual residence is in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. These projections do not include members of the Armed Forces overseas, their dependents, or other U.S. citizens residing outside the United States.

The projections are based on a monthly series of population estimates starting with the April 1, 2010 resident population from the 2010 Census.
At the end of each year, a new series of population estimates, from the census date forward, is used to revise the postcensal estimates, including the population clock projections series. Once a series of monthly projections is completed, the daily population clock numbers are derived by interpolation. Within each calendar month, the daily numerical population change is assumed to be constant, subject to negligible differences caused by rounding.

Population estimates produced by the U.S. Census Bureau for the United States, states, counties, and cities or towns can be found on the Population Estimates web page. Future projections for the United States and states can be found on the Population Projections web page.