The World of Statistics

What is Statistics?

When many people hear the word "statistics," they think of either sports-related numbers or the college class they took and barely passed. While statistics can be thought about in these terms, there is more to the relationship between you and statistics than you probably imagine.

So, what is statistics? Several informal definitions are offered in the book A Career in Statistics: Beyond the Numbers by Gerald Hahn and Necip Doganaksoy:

  • The science of learning from (or making sense out of) data
  • The theory and methods of extracting information from observational data for solving real-world problems
  • The science of uncertainty
  • The quintessential interdisciplinary science
  • The art of telling a story with [numerical] data

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Stats LifeThumbnail image for Techniques to Enhance Maths and Stats Education

A few months ago, the University of Glasgow hosted the first international conference of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) which explored approaches to teaching and learning mathematics. The idea was to develop a global community of educators willing to align their teaching approaches with the wide ranging learning needs sensitive to academic as well as cultural diversity. I shared a conference proposal which focused on the theme of enhancing teaching and learning mathematics with the vision of increasing educators’ awareness about barriers to student engagement with mathematics and statistics.

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StatsLife is the news, opinion and resource website of the Royal Statistical Society.

World Population Clock

Below are The World of Statistics participating organization events and activities around the world that will be conducted during October. To see the complete list of activities for 2015, please click here.

World of Statistics BlogThumbnail image for Statistics Meets Journalism in Stats+Stories Webcast

By John Bailer and Richard Campbell

Challenged to produce a course that would address those students who often fear quantitative reasoning, we collaborated on a new course titled "News & Numbers." Taken by honors students from four of five of Miami University’s colleges, the course was a success.

We enjoyed our partnership and vowed to look for other opportunities to continue a fruitful and fun-filled journalism-statistics partnership and started thinking that the time was right to launch a new collaboration.

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Significance MagazineThumbnail image for Patricia: A Record-breaking Hurricane?

Tropical storms are a seasonal feature of the Earth's oceans. Depending on where these terrifying phenomena occur they are called either typhoons (northwest Pacific Basin) or hurricanes (northeast Pacific and northern Atlantic basins) but in general they are referred to as cyclones. Often, once they reach the coast and move inland, they hurt (and sometimes kill) thousands of people and affect large swathes of territory.

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Significance is a publication of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association.

Census at School

Challenge Yourself Today!

We are proud to introduce Stats2013AtSchool—a Royal Statistical Society Centre for Statistical Education and American Statistical Association special project expressly designed for schools and students worldwide in support of The World of Statistics.

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Census at School is a free, web-based classroom project that engages primary and secondary school students in statistical problemsolving using their own data. This international educational initiative, launched in 2000 in the United Kingdom by the Royal Statistical Society Centre for Statistical Education, has programs operating in several countries.

Click here to view the Census at School program in your country or others around the world.

Statistician Job of the WeekThumbnail image for Hall: Creating Innovative Ways to Develop Population Statistics

By Kimberley Hall

My interest in research and statistics started during my degree in Sociology and Social Research, where I developed my skills in statistics and learnt vital statistical software skills along the way. I took an interesting path after my degree, veering off into market research for a couple of years. But, knowing that I wanted to focus on statistics, I joined the Office for National Statistics in 2011.

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